Some recent items of interest

October 4, 2015

Two of the seven economists that have agreed to become economic advisers to Jeremy Corbyn have published an article and a Q&A session offering some initial thoughts about some of the key issues of economic policy in the UK.

Mariana Mazzucato, who is the Professor of the Economics of Innovation at the Science Policy Research Unit of the University of Sussex (and author of “The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths”) has an article at Project Syndicate entitled “Jeremy Corbyn’s Necessary Agenda”.

Professor Anastasia Nesvetailova is Director of the City Political Economy Research Centre, and an expert on the international financial sector and its role in the global financial crisis of 2007-09. She took part in an interview entitled “Q&A: Can Corbyn revolutionise the financial sector and the Bank of England?” for the The Conversation website on which she gave her initial thoughts on four policy areas reportedly under consideration by Corbyn and his team.


 

Joseph Stiglitz, is a Nobel laureate in economics and University Professor at Columbia University, he was also Chairman of President Bill Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers and served as Senior Vice President and Chief Economist of the World Bank. In an article on the Project Syndicate website entitled “The Trans-Pacific Free-Trade Charade” he delivers a strong critique of the new Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).


 

There is an interesting data based analysis by Declan Gaffney posing the the question “Are in-work benefits in the UK a magnet for EU migrants?” on the Touch Stone web site. The comparative analysis of the levels of income and the role of welfare benefits in maintaining those incomes in various EU countries is very revealing and relates to the issue of in-work benefits I raised in the article entitled ‘Osborne’s Budget’ back in July.

peter Bruggen October 4, 2015

More and more interesting.

Tony October 4, 2015

Thanks – one can but try 🙂

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